Diana Wynne Jones Bibliography Page

Diana Wynne Jones (16 August 1934 – 26 March 2011) was a British writer of fantasy novels for children and adults. She wrote a small amount of non-fiction.

Fiction[edit]

This list follows the Internet Speculative Fiction Database in grouping many works in five fiction series. Some other classifications differ from ISFDB. There is some overlap in listings.

Stand alone books for adults[edit]

Stand alone books for children and young adults[edit]

Other Compilations

Series for children and young adults[edit]

Chrestomanci series[edit]

The Chrestomanci fantasy series comprises six novels and four short stories.[6]

Publication order The books in order of release:

  1. Charmed Life (1977) – Guardian Children's Fiction Prize; Carnegie Medal commendation; Preis der Leseratten (ZDF Schülerexpress, Germany)
  2. The Magicians of Caprona (1980)
  3. Witch Week (1982)
  4. The Lives of Christopher Chant (1988) – Carnegie Medal commendation
  5. Mixed Magics (2000), short stories published 1982 to 2000
  6. Conrad's Fate (2005)
  7. The Pinhoe Egg (2006) – Mythopoeic Fantasy Award Children's finalist;[3]Locus AwardYoung Adult Book, 6th place

If the short stories in Mixed Magics are counted separately, the order of release is:

  1. Charmed Life (1977)
  2. The Magicians of Caprona (1980)
  3. Witch Week (1982)
  4. "The Sage of Theare", in Hecate's Cauldron (1982) ed. Susan M. Schwartz
  5. "Warlock at the Wheel", in Warlock at the Wheel (1984) by Jones
  6. "Carol Oneir's Hundredth Dream", in Dragons and Dreams (1986) ed. Jane Yolen et al.
  7. The Lives of Christopher Chant (1988)
  8. "Stealer of Souls", in Mixed Magics (2000) by Jones
  9. Conrad's Fate (2005)
  10. The Pinhoe Egg (2006)

Reading order Diana Wynne Jones herself, however, recommended reading the books in this order:[7]

  1. Charmed Life (1977)
  2. The Lives of Christopher Chant (1988)
  3. Conrad's Fate (2005)
  4. Witch Week (1982)
  5. The Magicians of Caprona (1980)

The short stories in Mixed Magics can be read in any order after that. The Pinhoe Egg can probably be read after The Magicians of Caprona.

Chronological order

Two works feature Christopher Chant as a boy and teen; the others are set during his tenure as Chrestomanci. The narrative sequence is clear for all but two(‡).

  1. The Lives of Christopher Chant
  2. Conrad's Fate
  3. Charmed Life
  4. "Warlock at the Wheel"
  5. "The Sage of Theare"‡
  6. Witch Week
  7. The Magicians of Caprona
  8. "Stealer of Souls"
  9. "Carol Oneir's Hundredth Dream"
  10. The Pinhoe Egg

‡ Three of the short stories follow soon after the novels as listed here. On the other hand, "The Sage of Theare" does not have a fictional date or any landmark that relates it closely to another work in the series. (There is some evidence that it predates Witch Week whose own place is uncertain. Both works were published in 1982. In the novel, Chrestomanci observes that he likes to dress nicely and reveals that he has been called away in his dressing gown a couple of times in spite of his care. That may be an allusion to the short story, where he is summoned in pyjamas.)

Witch Week is set sometime after Charmed Life, in which Chrestomanci acquires his legal wardJanet Chant.

Chronicles of Chrestomanci The Chronicles of Chrestomanci series are set in three volumes:

Further Compilations

  • The Worlds of Chrestomanci (Chrestomanci # 1-4) (1998): Charmed Life, The Magicians of Caprona, Witch Week, and The Lives of Christopher Chant (Alternate Title: The Chrestomanci Quartet, 2000)
  • Diana Wynne Jones Chrestomanci 6 Books Collection (2012): Charmed Life, The Lives of Christopher Chant, Conrad's Fate, Witch Week, The Magicians of Caprona, and The Pinhoe Egg
  • The Chrestomanci Series: Entire Collection Books 1-7 (2013): Charmed Life, The Magicians of Caprona, Conrad's Fate, The Lives of Christopher Chant, Witch Week, The Pinhole Egg, Mixed Magics
  • The Chrestomanci Series: Books 1-3 (2014): Charmed Life, The Magicians of Caprona, and Conrad's Fate

Dalemark Quartet[edit]

In order of internal chronology:

  1. The Spellcoats (1979)
  2. Cart and Cwidder (1975)
  3. Drowned Ammet (1977)
  4. Crown of Dalemark (1993) – Mythopoeic Award, Children's Fantasy[3]

However, when the books were published by Oxford University Press, they were numbered in the order in which they were published (Cart, Ammet, Spellcoats, Crown), and it is possible to read them in this order without any spoilers. (Each of the three other than Crown is a self-contained story with no direct references to the characters or events of the other three books, except for tenuous connections between the characters of Spellcoats, and the folkloric heroes they would be remembered as by the time of the later books. Thusly, minor spoilers can be avoided by reading Spellcoats, the third book, but the order is otherwise irrelevant as long as Crown is read last.)

Compilations

Planned sequels Diana Wynne Jones insisted she would not be able to write a sequel to The Crown of Dalemark, until she had worked out what became of Tanaqui (The Spellcoats) after the One had reshaped the land[citation needed]. Unfortunately, any further sequels are unlikely following Diana Wynne Jones' passing in 2011.

Derkholm series[edit]

  1. Dark Lord of Derkholm (1998) – Mythopoeic Award, Children's Fantasy[3][10]
  2. Year of the Griffin (2000)

The Tough Guide to Fantasyland (1996) is noted to have similar themes.[citation needed]

Howl's Moving Castle series[edit]

  1. Howl's Moving Castle (1986) – Boston Globe–Horn Book Award Fiction runner-up;[1] 2006 Phoenix Award[4]
  2. Castle in the Air (1990) – Mythopoeic Fantasy Award Children's finalist[3]
  3. House of Many Ways (2008) – Mythopoeic Fantasy Award Children's finalist[3]

Compilations

Other Formats

Magids series[edit]

Picture books and books for younger readers[edit]

Compilations

Short stories[edit]

Anthologies[edit]

These are anthologies Diana Wynne Jones edited herself.

Contributed short stories[edit]

These short stories were not published as separate volumes, and not included in any collections entirely written by Jones (the next section).[6]

  • "Mela Worms", in Arrows of Eros (NEL, 1989, editor Alex Stewart)
  • "I'll Give You My Word", in Firebirds Rising: An Anthology of Original Science Fiction and Fantasy (Penguin, 2005, and 2006, editor Sharyn November), and Year’s Best Fantasy 7 (2007, editors David G. Hartnell & Kathryn Cramer)
  • "JoBoy", in The Dragon Book: Magical Tales from the Masters of Modern Fantasy (Ace, 2009, editors Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois), and The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year, Volume 4 (2010, editor Jonathan Strahan)
  • "Samantha's Diary", in Stories: All-New Tales (HarperCollins, 2010, editors Neil Gaiman and Al Sarrantonio)

Short story collections[edit]

These collections include about 25 pieces of short fiction with much repetition.[6]

  • Warlock at the Wheel and Other Stories (1984), 8 stories publ. 1978 to 1984
  • Everard’s Ride (1994/1995, republished 1997): a 1983 essay and 7 stories publ. 1984 to 1995
  • Stopping for a Spell: Three Fantasies (1993), publ. 1975 to 1989, Illustrated by Chris Mould
  • Minor Arcana (1996), UK Release, 7 stories publ. 1982 to 1995[6] – British Fantasy Award nominee
  • Believing is Seeing: Seven Stories (1999), US Release, 7 stories publ. 1982 to 1999, Illustrated by Nenad Jakesevik
  • Mixed Magics: Four Tales of Chrestomanci (2000)
  • Unexpected Magic: Collected Stories (2002), 16 stories published 1978 to 2003[6]

Stand alone short stories[edit]

Published also in other compilations

Other anthologies her works were included in[edit]

  • Young Winter's Tales 3 (1972, edited by M. R. Hodgkin), with "Carruthers"
  • Young Winter's Tales 6 (1975, edited by M. R. Hodgkin), with "Who Got Rid of Angus Flint?"
  • Young Winter's Tales 8 (1978, edited by D. J. Denney), with "Auntie Bea's Day Out"
  • Puffin Post v13 #4 (1979, magazine), with "The Fluffy Pink Toadstool"
  • The Cat Flap and the Apple Pie and Other Funny Stories (1979, edited by Lance Salway) with "Auntie Bea's Day Out"
  • Hecate’s Cauldron (1982, editor Susan Schwartz), with "The Sage of Theare"
  • Dragons & Dreams: A Collection of New Fantasy and Science Fiction Stories (1986, editor Jane Yolen), with "Carol Oneir’s Hundredth Dream"
  • Guardian Angels (1987, editor Stephanie Nuttell, Viking Kestrel) with "The Fat Wizard"[9]
  • The Methuen Book of Humorous Stories (1987, editor Jennifer Kavanagh, illustrator Scowler Anderson), with "Enna Hittims"
  • Gaslight and Ghosts (1988, editors Stephen Jones and Jo Fletcher) with "The Green Stone"
  • Arrows of Eros (1989, editor Alex Stewart), with "Mela Worms"
  • Dragons and Warrior Daughters: Fantasy Stories by Women Writers (1989, editor Jessica Yates), with "Dragon Reserve, Home Eight"
  • Hidden Turnings (1989), with "The Master"
  • Things That Go Bump in the Night (1989, editors Jane Yolen and Martin Harry Greenberg) with "Chair Person"
  • Digital Dreams (1990, editor David V. Barrett), with "Nad and Dan Adn Quaffy"
  • Heartache (1990, edited by Miraim Hodgson, Methuen), with "The Girl Who Loved the Sun"
  • Fenix, V3, #1, 1992 (1992, editor Rafal A. Ziemkiewicz), with "Mela Worms" (translation)
  • Bruce Coville's UFOs (1994, 2000, edited by Bruce Coville), with "Dragon Reserve, Home Eight"
  • A Treasury of Witches and Wizards (1996, editor David Bennett), republished The Kingfisher Treasury of Witch and Wizard Stories (2004, editor David Bennett), with "The Fat Wizard"
  • The Random House Book of Fantasy Stories (1997, editor Mike Ashley), alternate title Fantasy Stories, with "The Green Stone"
  • Mystery Stories (1998, editor Helen Cresswell), with "The Master"
  • The Wizards’ Den: Spellbinding Stories of Magic & Magicians (2001 and 2003, editor Peter Haining), with "Carol Oneir’s Hundredth Dream"
  • Firebirds: An Anthology of Original Fantasy and Science Fiction (2003, editor Sharyn November), with "Little Dot"
  • The Mammoth Book of Sorcerer’s Tales: The Ultimate Collection of Magical Fantasy (2004, editor Mike Ashley), with "The Sage of Theare"
  • Now We Are Sick: An Anthology of Nasty Verse (2005, Editors Neil Gaiman and Stephen Jones), with "A Slice of Life" (Poetry for adults)
  • Firebirds Rising: An Anthology of Original Science Fiction and Fantasy (2005 and 2006, editor Sharyn November), with "I’ll Give you My Word"
  • Year’s Best Fantasy 7 (2007, editors David G. Hartnell & Kathryn Cramer), with "I’ll Give You My Word"
  • Plokta, May 2009 (2009, editors Steve Davies, Alison Scott, and Mike Scott), with "Samantha's Diary"
  • The Dragon Book: Magical Tales from the Masters of Modern Fantasy (2009, editors Jack Dann and Gardner Dozois), with "JoBoy"
  • The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year, Volume 4 (2010, editor Jonathan Strahan), with "JoBoy"
  • Stories: All-New Tales (2010, editors Neil Gaiman and Al Sarrantonio), with "Samantha’s Diary"
  • Unnatural Creatures (2013, editor Neil Gaiman), with "The Sage of Theare"
  • The Mammoth Book of Dark Magic (2013, editor Mike Ashley, alternate title The Mammoth Book of Black Magic, with "The Sage of Theare"
  • Escape Pod, EP427 (2013, editor Norm Sherman), with "Samantha's Diary"

Complete list of short stories in alphabetical order[edit]

  • "Auntie Bea’s Day Out", found in Auntie Bea's Day Out (standalone, 1978), and The Cat Flap and the Apple Pie and Other Funny Stories (1979), and Warlock at the Wheel and Other Stories (1984), and Unexpected Magic: Collected Stories (2002), and Freaky Families (2013)
  • "Carol Oneir’s Hundredth Dream", found in Dragons & Dreams: A Collection of New Fantasy and Science Fiction Stories (1986), and Mixed Magics: Four Tales of Chrestomanci (2000), and The Wizards’ Den: Spellbinding Stories of Magic & Magicians (2001 and 2003)
  • "Carruthers", found in Young Winter's Tales 3 (1972), and Warlock at the Wheel and Other Stories (1984), and Unexpected Magic: Collected Stories (2002)
  • "Chair Person", found in Things that Go Bump in the Night (1989), and Chair Person (stand alone 1989), and Stopping for a Spell (2002), and Vile Visitors (2012)
  • "Dragon Reserve, Home Eight", found in Warlock at the Wheel and Other Stories (1984), and Dragons and Warrior Daughters: Fantasy Stories by Women Writers (1989), and Bruce Coville's UFOs (1994, 2000), and Everard’s Ride (1995, republished 1997), and Minor Arcana (1996), and Believing is Seeing: Seven Stories (1999), and Unexpected Magic: Collected Stories (2002)
  • "Enna Hittims", found in The Methuen Book of Humorous Stories (1987), and Believing is Seeing: Seven Stories (1999), and Unexpected Magic: Collected Stories (2002), and Enna Hittims

Diana Wynne Jones, (born Aug. 16, 1934, London, Eng.—died March 26, 2011, Bristol), British fantasy writer of more than 40 books for children, many of which centre on magic or magicians.

Jones was the oldest of three sisters and often looked after her siblings—partly because of a complicated relationship with their parents, who were both teachers. Despite struggling with dyslexia, she did well in school as a child and developed a keen interest in books, reading works such as The Thousand and One Nights and Sir Thomas Malory’s Le Morte Darthur at a young age. Jones decided early that she wanted to become a writer, and when she was 13 years old she began writing stories for her sisters.

In 1953 Jones entered St. Anne’s College, Oxford, where she studied English (B.A., 1956) and attended lectures by renowned authors C.S. Lewis and J.R.R. Tolkien. In 1956 Jones married John Burrow, with whom she had three sons. She read books with her children as they were growing up, which served as an introduction to the world of children’s literature—of which Jones had read little in her own childhood. During this time she submitted a few of her works to publishers and agents, but they were rejected. Though the majority of her books were written for children, Jones’s first published novel, Changeover (1970), was intended for adults. Despite having penned the novel in 1966, Jones did not embark on her writing career in earnest until all her children were in school.

After being introduced to a literary agent, Jones went on to write Wilkins’ Tooth (1973; also published as Witch’s Business), Eight Days of Luke (1975), The Ogre Downstairs (1974), and dozens more over the next several decades. Many of her books feature magic or magicians. Among the most famous are The Chronicles of Chrestomanci series and Howl’s Moving Castle (1986)—the latter of which was made into a successful animated film by Japanese director Miyazaki Hayao in 2004. Another of her works, The Tough Guide to Fantasyland (1996; revised 2006), serves as a humorous exploration of the clichés of her favoured genre. Jones was the recipient of many honours and awards, including a World Fantasy Award for lifetime achievement in 2007.

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